Blog

Jun

25

Prometheus and Myriad -- how two supreme court rulings have freed biomarkers and genes from bondage

Tuesday, June 25, 2013 - 7:55pm

In recent decades, biomarkers and genes have become essential in diagnosing disease and assessing patients’ responses to therapy. They are the language of desktop medicine. The increasing quantitative rigor and efficiency of these tests have led to the possibility of “personalized medicine.”  Despite such progress,...

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Jun

18

The Assessment of Capacity for Everyday Decisionmaking (the ACED). An instrument that puts assessment into our ethics and ethics into our assessments.

Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - 9:22am

Developed by James Lai and Jason Karlawish, the ACED is useful for assessing an adult’s capacity to solve functional problems. It is especially helpful to sort out whether to respect a disabled adult’s refusal of assistance to manage their disability. You can read more about why assessing capacity matters in this Huffington Post blog post by Dr. Mark Lachs...

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Apr

28

Remarks delivered at the April 24, 2013 conference "Finding Humanity in Advanced Dementia," sponsored by the PNP Program at Washington University in St. Louis

Sunday, April 28, 2013 - 7:52pm

This and the other talks from the conference can be listened to on YouTube.

In one of my first substantive memories of a person with advanced dementia, I’m standing at the threshold to the room in the nursing home where my great grandmother lay. I don’t want to say she lived there because in the weeks and months after she fell from the step that led up to...

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Feb

15

Many thanks to Louise Aronson for “tagging” me in the Next Big Thing blog book tour.

Friday, February 15, 2013 - 9:59am

Louise is the author of the just published story collection, A History of the Present Illness, and she’s also a thoughtful physician who writes on medical education and the role of narrative in medicine. She lives in San Francisco and practices at UCSF and like...

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Jan

25

Take the blue pill or red pill? How the electronic medical record could save the clinical trial, cut health care costs, and improve the value of research.

Friday, January 25, 2013 - 10:27am

My colleague James Flory and I just published this essay on Science Progress' blog. It develops the concept of the PORT trial, an idea we published in an article in the American Journal of Public Health.

PORT stands for "Prompted Optional Randomization Trial." What's that? It's a...

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Dec

20

Alzheimer's Patients with Non-Spousal Caregivers are Less Likely to Participate in Clinical Trials

Thursday, December 20, 2012 - 7:18pm

PHILADELPHIA — People with Alzheimer's disease are less likely to participate in a clinical trial if they have non-spouse caregivers, according to a study by a team of researchers including the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The new study, published in the December 19th, 2012, issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology, demonstrates that additional recruitment and retention...

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